s2w6s5q3to.gq

Translation

Tute. , likes · 33, talking about this. Soy Tute, humorista gráfico argentino. Autor de Batu. Publico el cuadro diario Tutelandia en La Nación y.

The winner of the last trick can choose whether or not to claim the 10 extra points. If possible, a player can declare several combination.

ProLED V Automotive Replacement Lithium Iron Phosphate High Power Discharging Battery 65Ah CCA A Quick Charging LiFePO4 LFP Battery 2 Years Warranty.
ProLED V Automotive Replacement Lithium Iron Phosphate High Power Discharging Battery 65Ah CCA A Quick Charging LiFePO4 LFP Battery 2 Years Warranty.
Sep 01,  · Finnish [] Verb []. tuta (obsolete, literary, crosswords) Alternative form of tuntea (
Words near tute in the dictionary. tutania; Tutankhamen; tutankhamon; Tutankhamun; tute; tutee; Follow YourDictionary.
Naju Ft Tute - Solo Quiero Amarte [Cover PunkRock - Hernan & La Champions Liga] - Duration: 2 minutes, 38 seconds. Salgode noxe. 4, views; 5 years ago; This item has been hidden.
Amazon Fashion

The Web's Largest Resource for

Freebase ( / 0 votes) Rate this definition. Tute. Tute is an Italian trick-taking card game for two to four players. During the 19th century, the game spread in Spain, becoming one of the most popular card games in the country.

If there are three players to begin with, then in the first hand the centre card is dealt face down, and the holder of the two of coins exchanges it for the centre card, which is not seen by any of the other players. If no one holds the two of coins because it is the centre card , the holder of the four of coins is mano.

In subsequent hands with three players, the centre card is dealt face up and its suit is trumps. If it is higher than a 7, the holder of the 7 of trumps can exchange it for this card.

If it is a 5, 6 or 7, the holder of the 2 of trumps can exchange it for the centre card. The rules of play and singing are the same as in partnership Tute.

Note that there is no obligation to sing when you are able to, and sometimes it is better not to sing. At the end of the play, players who have taken tricks count their points, not forgetting the 10 for the last trick, and the points for singing if any.

Then assuming that there are no ties, the result is determined as follows:. The cases where some of the players who have taken tricks have equal numbers of points are resolved as follows:. The usual penalty for infractions failing to follow suit, failing to beat the highest card played, etc.

A count is kept of how many times each player has lost, and as already explained, a player who has lost four times must retire from the game. It is not quite clear what happens if the player whose turn it was to deal next has to drop out. I would suggest that he should only drop out after having dealt the next hand to the remaining players, so that the player to his right does not lose a turn to be mano.

With more than three players, some prefer to rotate the trumps suit instead of turning up the mano 's last card. The sequence of suits is coins, cups, swords, clubs, coins, etc. Some break ties using the seating order - the player whose turn to play in the first trick was earlier is considered to have more points.

In the examples above, assuming that the players A, B, C, D, E are listed in counter-clockwise order and A is mano, A would lose as well as B and E in the first case because A's 23 is higher than D's 23 , and in the second case B would lose alone because B's 28 is higher than E's This is a version of Tute for 2, 3 or 4 players played in Aragón, Navarra and part of Castilla.

In Guiñote the horse caballo and jack sota change places. These rule differences can be applied to any of the versions of Tute described above, producing corresponding variations of Guiñote.

Emilio Platzer's page tute. Tute This page is partly based on information from Luis Fernando Gimnez and John Williamson and also draws on descriptions of Tute in several books, such as: The Cards For Tute, a standard Spanish pack of 40 cards is used. The suits and the rank and value of the cards in each suit are as follows: Partnership Tute The deal The first dealer is chosen at random and the turn to deal passes to the right after each hand.

The Play The cards are played out in tricks, the object being to win tricks containing high-value cards. Scoring When all the cards have been played, each team counts the points in the tricks they have won. Variations A tute is a combination of all four kings or all four horses held in one hand.

Some play that if a team wins with or more points, they win two games instead of one. Individual Tute Luis Fernando Gimnez describes the following version of Tute for three or two players playing as individuals. Tute corriente The books say that this two-player game is the oldest form of Tute.

Tute habanero This is another two player game. The rules are the same as for tute corriente except for the following: Eight cards are dealt to each player, instead of six. There is an alternative way of winning, called capote. At the moment when the stock is exhausted, if you think you can win all of the last eight tricks, you can announce this. If you succeed you win, irrespective of the number of points taken by either player.

On the other hand if you lose even one of the last eight tricks after announcing capote , your opponent wins the game. Tute americano This is another two player game. Eight cards are dealt to each player instead of six. Declarations of tute 4 kings or 4 horses are not valid. During the first part of the game, while there are cards in the stock, if a trump is led you must play a trump but need not overtake the lead.

If a non-trump is led you may play any card. If you fail to play a trump on a trump lead, then you must keep separate all cards that you subsequently draw from the stock, so that you can demonstrate to your opponent that you had no trumps at the time when you failed to follow suit, any trumps you eventually acquire having been picked up later.

When the stock is exhausted you must follow suit, beat the led card, and trump if you have none of the suit, as usual. The winner is the first player to score or more points. Tute arrastrado This is a game for three players, though often four play with the dealer sitting out of each hand. The players There are three players, each playing for themselves, though two will be partners against the third in each hand.

It is also possible for four to play, with the dealer sitting out of each hand or acting as censor. The cards Only 36 cards are used - the twos from the 40 card pack are set aside. The rank and values of the remaining cards are as usual in Tute. The deal The deal, bidding and play are anticlockwise. Twelve cards are dealt to each player in ones.

In this version of Tute no card is turned face up for trumps - the trump suit will be chosen by the highest bidder. Object of the game In each deal one player becomes the soloist, who is determined by auction. The soloist's aim is to take at least the number of points bid, by capturing scoring cards in tricks, winning the last trick and making declarations. The other players' aim is of course to prevent the soloist from doing so.

The bidding After each deal there is a round of bidding to determine the soloist. The player to dealer's right begins by either saying "pass" or bidding a number of points; the minimum bid is 60 points and bids must be made in multiples of five. The second and third player in turn each either pass or bid a higher number of points than was bid by the previous player.

There is only one round of bidding and the player who bids the highest number of points becomes the soloist. If all three players pass, the hands are thrown in and there is a fresh deal. The play The soloist declares which suit is to be trumps and leads to the first trick.

The rules of trick taking are as follows: The trick is won by the highest trump played, or, if no trumps are played, by the highest card of the suit led. It is obligatory, if possible, to play a card of the suit led and to head the trick. If suit cannot be followed, then you must trump the trick and play a higher trump than any so far played to the trick. If, however, you can neither follow suit nor play a higher trump, you may play any card. Declarations After winning a trick and before leading to the next, the soloist may declare the holding of a rey king and caballo horse of the same suit.

If in the trump suit, the declaration scores 40 points. A declaration in any other suit scores 20 points. Only one declaration may be made at a time.

Both cards must be shown, and a declaration in trumps must be made before a declaration in any other suit. Scoring When all the tricks have been played, determine whether the bid has been made by adding up: If the soloist succeeds in making at least the number of points bid, each of the opponents pays the soloist according to the agreed stake e. If the soloist fails to make enough points, the soloist pays each opponent the amount agreed.

If the soloist's bid was points or more the payment for the bid won or lost is doubled. Variations Some play that the minimum bid is 50 or 70, rather than Some play that all bids must be in multiples of ten rather than five. Some allow the bidding to go around the table more than once. The censor When playing tute subastado with four players, it can be agreed that the dealer should act as a censor. In this version of the game, at the end of the auction the dealer looks at the soloists's hand and has the option announcing a higher bid and temporarily swapping places with the soloist.

In the dealer takes this option the cards are played and the dealer wins or loses from the two opponents on the basis of the increased bid; the displaced soloist neither pays nor is paid. The players then resume their places and the game continues. If the dealer chooses not to increase the bid, the hand is played out between the soloist and the opponents in the usual way.

Tute gana-pierde Tute gana-pierde win-lose tute has at least two versions: Version for 4 or 5 players. In this version the player who takes the most points is the loser, unless that player manages to take or more points and win. There are 4 or 5 players.

The dealer deals out all the cards singly, exposing the last to determine the trump suit. The player to dealer's right leads and the cards are played out under the usual rules. A player who wins a trick containing a king and horse of the same suit gets an extra 20 points - or 40 if the suit is trumps. It is also possible to sing a 40 or 20 after winning a trick if one has the king and horse of a suit in hand - though clearly this would only be done by a player aiming to take or more points.

The winner of the last trick can choose whether or not to claim the 10 extra points. At the end of the play, the players count their points individually, and if no one has taken more than points, the player who has taken the most points loses. If a player takes or more points or more, that player wins and all the others lose. If there is a tie for most points, and one of the tieing players took the last trick, that player loses. If none of the tieing players took the last trick, then the one of them sitting nearest to the right of the player who did take the last trick loses.

Version for 3 players This is played with a reduced pack of 36 cards, omitting the twos. The object is to take most or least points, avoiding coming in the middle. Twelve cards are dealt to each player; no card is turned up for trumps, and the first part of the hand is played without trumps.

The player to dealer's right leads to the first trick, and the usual rules of play apply. If the king and horse of the same suit are played to the same trick, the winner of this trick must declare 40 and score 40 points, and the suit of the king and horse becomes trumps, starting with the next trick, for the rest of the hand. If there are any further tricks which contain the king and horse of a suit, the trick winner must declare this and score There is no singing of combinations held in a player's hand.

The winner of the last trick scores 10 points and players count the points they have won. The player who has the middle score is the loser. In case of a tie between two players, if the tieing players' scores are less than the third player's score, the third player loses. If the third player's score is less, the tieing players both lose. The session continues until a player has lost six times, and that player is the overall loser. Tute Cabrero This game for 3 to 6 players, playing as individuals, is popular in Argentina and Uruguay.

Deal and play are counter-clockwise. When there are six players, the dealer deals 8 cards to each of the other five players. The dealer has no cards, does not take part in the play, and therefore cannot lose on this deal. When there are 5 players, 8 cards are dealt to each player. When there are 4 players, 10 cards are dealt to each player.

When there are 3 players, 13 cards are dealt to each player, and one card to the centre of the table. Then assuming that there are no ties, the result is determined as follows: If five players have taken tricks, then there are three losers: If four players have taken tricks, then there are two losers: If three players have taken tricks, then there is just one loser: If two players have taken tricks, then again then there is just one loser: If one player took all the tricks, but did not sing, then all the other players lose, except for the dealer in a six-player game.

The object of the game is to score the most points in the baza a pile next to a player that contains the cards that the player gets after winning a trick and by declarations holding certain combinations of cards. Due to its wide popularity, several variations of the game exist. Tute originated in Italy. The name of the game originated from the Italian word Tutti all , the declaration that a player announces when holding the four kings.

As the popularity of the game increased, its name was modified over time by Spanish speakers, who started calling the game Tute. The game is played with a Spanish deck of cards, which is divided into four suits: Oros coins , Espadas spades , Copas cups and Bastos clubs. The 8s and 9s of each suit are excluded, leaving forty cards in the deck. During the deal, each player receives eight cards.

After the last card is dealt, one more card is drawn. It indicates which suit becomes the trump. The card is placed perpendicular to the stock , at the bottom.

The first player chooses a card to play. If the second player has one or more cards of higher value of the same suit as this card, one of them must be played, and the second player wins the trick. If the second player has cards of the same suit, but only ones of less value than the first card, one of these must be played; in this case, the second player loses the trick.

If the second player does not have any cards of the same suit but has one or more trump cards, one of these must be played; the second player wins the trick. If the second player has no cards of the same suit and no trumps, any other card can be played, and the second player loses the trick. The winning player takes both cards of the trick, and places them face down in an individual pile on the table, called the baza. These cards are out of play until scores are calculated, at the end of the round.

The winner of the trick takes the first card from the stock, and the loser the second; thus, until the stock runs out, they each hold ten cards at the start of every trick.

When the trump card at the bottom of the deck is superior to a 7 Ace, Three, King, Knight, or Knave , the player that holds the 7 of the trump suit is able to exchange it for any of these. The 7, and cards of lesser value 6, 5, and 4 , can later be exchanged only by a 2. The trump exchanges are allowed anytime in the game until only the last two cards are left in the stock. After a player makes the first baza , that player is allowed to announce declarations.

After these final two cards are picked up, all of the cards the players hold must be played in order to finish the round. When the round is over, the players start to count their scores see Scoring below. After the counting ends, and their scores are calculated, the cards in the bazas are mixed again in a single stock to be dealt at the start of the next round. Tute in Pairs is played by four players—two teams of two players each—and every player receives ten cards since there are 40 cards, this means that all of the cards in the deck are dealt.

The last card to be dealt is shown to the rest of the players and becomes the trump. This card belongs to the player it was dealt to. The four people sit in a circle, with opponent players to the right and left of each player, and players sitting opposite their team members. One person plays a card, and the player to the right of this person, from the opponent team, plays a card. As with Two-player Tute, if the second player has one or more higher cards of the same suit as the first player's card, one of these must be played.

If the second player has cards of the same suit, but only ones of less value than the first card, one of these must be played. If the second player does not have any cards of the same suit but has one or more trump cards, one of these must be played.

If the second player has no cards of the same suit and no trumps, any other card can be played. Now, the next player to the right plays a card following the same rules as the second player: The fourth player likewise plays a card following these same rules. When all four cards of the trick are on the table, the pair that played the card with the strongest card wins the hand. The trump suit beats the other three suits, with the ranking of trump cards from strongest to weakest as follows: The next strongest suit is the one the first player played, again with the card rankings being AceKing-Knight-Knave Cards of the other two suits always lose to trumps and the first player's suit.

Introduction

Tute education helps hundreds of schools to improve pupil attainment through evidence-based online teaching by real qualified teachers in live online group lessons. Freebase ( / 0 votes) Rate this definition. Tute. Tute is an Italian trick-taking card game for two to four players. During the 19th century, the game spread in Spain, becoming one of the most popular card games in the country. Tute. This page is partly based on information from Luis Fernando Gimnez and John Williamson and also draws on descriptions of Tute in several books, such as.